O Polvo como cartografia persuasiva

W. B. Northrop, “Landlordism Causes Unemployment” (1909), showing the octopus of “Landlordism” strangling London, although the map leaves the royal family’s estates out of its lands owned by the wealthy (courtesy Persuasive Maps: PJ Mode Collection, Cornell University Library)

The Octopus, a Motif of Evil in Historical Propaganda Maps

follow url Allison Meier. May 8, 2017. Hyperallergic

here Caricaturist Fred W. Rose’s 1877 map published in the midst of the Russo-Turkish War shows Russia creeping like an octopus across the globe, its tentacles grasping at land on all sides. While the other countries are illustrated as people, Russia is depicted as something alien and monstrous. The arresting visual began a trend of cartographic cephalopods, many of which feature in the PJ Mode Collection at Cornell University Library.

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Philadelphia Assembled

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enter site Philadelphia Assembled is an expansive project that tells a story of radical community building and active resistance through the personal and collective narratives that make up Philadelphia’s changing urban fabric. These narratives will be explored through a collaborative effort between the Philadelphia Museum of Art and a team of individuals, collectives, and organizations as they experiment with multiple methodologies for amplifying and connecting relationships in Philadelphia’s transforming landscape. Challenging, inspiring, and as big as the city, Philadelphia Assembled asks: how can we collectively shape our futures?

structure

http://weselny-duet.pl/visre/pieor/81 Initiated by artist Jeanne van Heeswijk, together with a collaborative team of artists, makers, storytellers, gardeners, healers, activists, Museum staff and community members, Philadelphia Assembled explores social issues that resonate in “The City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection.” Within this project, these urgent concerns are organized around five principles, or what van Heeswijk terms “atmospheres”: Reconstructions, Sovereignty, Futures, Sanctuary, and Movement. The subject of each atmosphere was derived from the artist’s preliminary conversations with people throughout Philadelphia about the city and its character. Reconstructions engages with (re)writing personal and historical narratives and (re)imagining the built environment; Sovereignty asks questions about self-determination and forms of freedom; Futures seeks to reclaim the past and the present in order to decolonize and re-design the future; and Sanctuary unpacks the complexities of seeking and making safe space across the city. The Movement atmosphere is dedicated to modes and methodologies of dissemination, including education, performance, production, and mapping. Through Movement, knowledge, skills, and narratives are assembled, distributed, and re-enacted.

in the city + at the Museum

go In spring 2017, Philadelphia Assembled will manifest as a series of actions, conversations, meals, installations, and other events throughout the city. What we build together will culminate in a communal presentation at the Museum’s Perelman Building in fall 2017, becoming a civic stage where the city is performed.

les rencontres d après minuit stream In the midst of Philadelphia’s changing infrastructure, demographics, and economy, Philadelphia Assembled will ask questions about what histories can be rewritten (Reconstructions), what resources can be shared (Sovereignty), what futures can be imagined (Futures), what asylum can be offered (Sanctuary), and how can we disseminate our collective learning (Movement).

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The story of electricity

nanaimo dating sites free The story of electricity is the story of life itself. From the structure of the atom to the functioning of our brains, this invisible yet vital force is intrinsic to human life. For centuries electricity has captivated inventors, scientists and artists alike, and in the modern era it has transformed our world.

rencontre grand ouest nantes From the first breaths of Frankenstein’s monster to the brutal simplicity of the execution chair, this exhibition contemplates the contradictory life-giving and death-dealing extremes generated by electricity, and traces the story of how humanity has striven to understand, unlock and gain control over this invisible yet all-encompassing force, which continues to mystify and amaze.

http://euromessengers.org/?biodetd=bin%C3%A4re-option-zoomtrader&53a=f2 Three celebrated artists have been commissioned to create three new artworks for this exhibition: John Gerrard has taken inspiration for his commission from Luigi Galvani’s famous experiments into bioelectricity; Bill Morrison explores historical footage from the Electricity Council archive to consider the movement and networks of electricity and its profound interconnectedness with our daily lives; and Camille Henrot considers our energy-dependent lifestyles, as well as the relationship between humans, technology and the environment.

A trio of films accompany the exhibition, each profiling one of the contemporary artists. The first, featuring John Gerrard, can be found here.

Electricity: The spark of life will run from February 23–June 25, 2017. It is curated by Lucy Shanahan and Ruth Garde, Wellcome Collection, with consultant curator Paul Bonaventura. The exhibition has been produced in collaboration with Teylers Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands and the Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, UK. Following its presentation at Wellcome Collection it will tour to both venues in summer 2017 and 2018 respectively.

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How would art museums, art auctions, and art collectors deal with Snapchat? Snap Art?

The story of electricity is the story of life itself. From the structure of the atom to the functioning of our brains, this invisible yet vital force is intrinsic to human life. For centuries electricity has captivated inventors, scientists and artists alike, and in the modern era it has transformed our world.

From the first breaths of Frankenstein’s monster to the brutal simplicity of the execution chair, this exhibition contemplates the contradictory life-giving and death-dealing extremes generated by electricity, and traces the story of how humanity has striven to understand, unlock and gain control over this invisible yet all-encompassing force, which continues to mystify and amaze.

Three celebrated artists have been commissioned to create three new artworks for this exhibition: John Gerrard has taken inspiration for his commission from Luigi Galvani’s famous experiments into bioelectricity; Bill Morrison explores historical footage from the Electricity Council archive to consider the movement and networks of electricity and its profound interconnectedness with our daily lives; and Camille Henrot considers our energy-dependent lifestyles, as well as the relationship between humans, technology and the environment.

A trio of films accompany the exhibition, each profiling one of the contemporary artists. The first, featuring John Gerrard, can be found here.

Electricity: The spark of life will run from February 23–June 25, 2017. It is curated by Lucy Shanahan and Ruth Garde, Wellcome Collection, with consultant curator Paul Bonaventura. The exhibition has been produced in collaboration with Teylers Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands and the Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, UK. Following its presentation at Wellcome Collection it will tour to both venues in summer 2017 and 2018 respectively.

What’s the point of Snapchat and how does it work?
ELYSE BETTERS20 JANUARY 2017 APPS—Pocket-lint

Snapchat is a photo- and video-messaging app. It launched in 2011.

Snapchat is unique in that all photos and videos only last a brief amount of time before they disappear forever, making the app ephemeral in nature, though you can take a screenshot of all the snaps you receive to save them in picture form. You can also save your own snaps before sending them to friends or you story.

As of May 2014, the app’s users were sending 700 million snaps a day. Due to the instant popularity of Snapchat, Facebook reportedly offered to acquire Snapchat for $3 billion. One of the app’s co-founders declined the cash offer, however. Facebook later launched a similar app, called Slingshot, but it failed to catch on.

Arte e técnica

Robótica, inteligência artificial e Internet das Coisas são o resultado da interceção performativa entre ciência > tecnologia > arte (por esta ordem, mas também por esta outra: arte > ciência > tecnologia)

Initiated by artist Jeanne van Heeswijk, together with a collaborative team of artists, makers, storytellers, gardeners, healers, activists, Museum staff and community members, Philadelphia Assembled explores social issues that resonate in “The City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection.” Within this project, these urgent concerns are organized around five principles, or what van Heeswijk terms “atmospheres”: Reconstructions, Sovereignty, Futures, Sanctuary, and Movement. The subject of each atmosphere was derived from the artist’s preliminary conversations with people throughout Philadelphia about the city and its character. Reconstructions engages with (re)writing personal and historical narratives and (re)imagining the built environment; Sovereignty asks questions about self-determination and forms of freedom; Futures seeks to reclaim the past and the present in order to decolonize and re-design the future; and Sanctuary unpacks the complexities of seeking and making safe space across the city. The Movement atmosphere is dedicated to modes and methodologies of dissemination, including education, performance, production, and mapping. Through Movement, knowledge, skills, and narratives are assembled, distributed, and re-enacted.

in the city + at the Museum

In spring 2017, Philadelphia Assembled will manifest as a series of actions, conversations, meals, installations, and other events throughout the city. What we build together will culminate in a communal presentation at the Museum’s Perelman Building in fall 2017, becoming a civic stage where the city is performed.

In the midst of Philadelphia’s changing infrastructure, demographics, and economy, Philadelphia Assembled will ask questions about what histories can be rewritten (Reconstructions), what resources can be shared (Sovereignty), what futures can be imagined (Futures), what asylum can be offered (Sanctuary), and how can we disseminate our collective learning (Movement).

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